Ways to Prepare for Reopening Your Company

Written by Emily Liu

On May 4, 2020

Starting in mid-March, many companies were forced to shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. In New York, the pandemic appears to have passed its peak. Lower risk businesses in the state can prepare to reopen as soon as mid-May. The New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo said on April 27th that the reopen “has to be smart,” which means companies should have new rules to ensure they are re-opening safely. This article provides you some advice to help you be more ready to get your business back to normal as soon as possible.
 

Improve Workplace Hygiene

 
As employees spend 8 hours in their workplace, it is essential to ensure that they are in a hygienic environment. Business owners should keep the cleanliness of their community space, such as conference rooms and cafeteria. Put sanitizer dispensers in these areas to make sure employees clean their hands up before touching the equipment. For frequently touched surfaces such as buttons and light switches, place tissue beside them, so employees can protect their hands with tissue to avoid direct touch. Some companies have changed their doorknobs to hooks to enable employees to open doors with their forearms, which is also a good idea to prevent contact infection.
 

Ensure Employees’ Health

 
To reopen, the first thing companies should make sure of is that everyone working in the office is healthy. It is necessary to monitor employees’ health during their work time. Companies can take employees’ temperature every morning when they enter the workplace and let managers make a record for it. Keeping social distance is still essential during this time. Provide employees with a personal workspace and prevent them from using other desks or phones. Replace the face-to-face interaction between employees and customers with online communication as much as possible. If the employee has to interact with customers directly, create additional space between them.
 

Adjust Company Policy

 
According to experts, mass gathering poses a threat to the spread of infectious diseases. Therefore, companies can reduce or cancel large meeting formats or host them online. Slightly adjust the work schedule so employees can avoid the peak of commuting traffic. By doing this, the chance of getting infected in public transportation can be reduced. Companies should also make the work from home policy more flexible. Do not let employees feel pressured to come to work even when they feel sick. Besides, as schools remain closed, some employees may still need to take care of children at home. If it is necessary, allow them to work from home one or two days a week.

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